Are dash cams legal? | Nextbase US

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Are dash cams legal?

14th August 2019

While Dash Cams are legal to have in your car on the road, restrictions affecting legal Dash Cam installation and placement do vary from state to state. Certain jurisdictions in the U.S. have restrictions intended to prevent any obstruction of the driver’s view of the road, which impacts where the Dash Cam can legally be placed on the windshield. In addition, certain states have stipulations around consenting parties with surveillance and privacy if audio is used with Dash Cams.

Ultimately it is undeniable that Dash Cams are a great way to improve the security of motorists on the road, and as the popularity around the use of Dash Cam footage grows with law enforcement and insurers in helping provide irrefutable evidence in the event of an incident, it is highly unlikely drivers would be pulled over unless the Dash Cam is mounted in an area of the windshield that obstructs the view of the road for the driver. A great example of the increasing support from law enforcement can be heard during a recent segment featuring Nextbase with Daily Mail TV, where former NYPD Lieutenant Darrin Porcher commented: “You’ve heard the term a picture is worth a thousand words, well a video is worth a million words.”

There is no law that forbids a driver from installing a Dash Cam in their vehicle, but we recommend that all U.S. motorists research their state’s laws before mounting a Dash Cam to ensure that it meets legal requirements.

Dash cam legality by state

To see if your state applies restrictions to Dash Cams in your vehicle, refer to the chart below that breaks down these laws on a state-by-state basis:

State Are Dash Cams legal? Restrictions Source
Alabama No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Alaska Yes Legal with restrictions Source
Arizona Yes Legal with restrictions Source
Arkansas Yes Legal with restrictions Source
California Yes Legal with restrictions, surveillance rules Source
Colorado Yes Legal with restrictions Source
Connecticut No Prohibited with exceptions, surveillance rules Source
Delaware No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Florida No Prohibited with exceptions, surveillance rules Source
Georgia No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Hawaii Yes Legal with restrictions Source
Idaho No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Illinois Yes Legal with restrictions, surveillance rules Source
Indiana Yes Legal with restrictions Source
Iowa No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Kansas No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Kentucky No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Louisiana Yes Legal with restrictions Source
Maine No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Maryland Yes Legal with restrictions, surveillance rules Source
Massachusetts No Prohibited with exceptions, surveillance rules Source
Michigan No Prohibited with exceptions, surveillance rules Source
Minnesota Yes Legal with restrictions Source
Mississippi No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Missouri Yes Legal without restrictions Source
Montana No Prohibited with exceptions, surveillance rules Source
Nebraska No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Nevada Yes Legal with restrictions, surveillance rules Source
New Hampshire No Prohibited with exceptions, surveillance rules Source
New Jersey No Prohibited with exceptions Source
New Mexico No Prohibited with exceptions Source
New York No prohibited with exceptions Source
North Carolina Yes Legal without restrictions Source
North Dakota No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Ohio No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Oklahoma No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Oregon No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Pennsylvania No Prohibited with exceptions, surveillance rules Source
Rhode Island No Prohibited with exceptions Source
South Carolina No Prohibited with exceptions Source
South Dakota No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Tennessee No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Texas No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Utah Yes Legal with restrictions Source
Vermont Yes Legal with restrictions Source
Virginia No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Washington No Prohibited with exceptions, surveillance rules Source
Washington DC Yes Legal with restrictions Source
West Virginia No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Wisconsin No Prohibited with exceptions Source
Wyoming No Prohibited with exceptions Source

 

Disclaimer: The legality of mounted devices to motorist’s windshields within each state is subject to change at will. Even if it is legal to use a Dash Cam mounted in the windshield in your state as of today, that could change without notice at any time in the future. Before mounting a Dash Cam to your windshield, you should either consult with a lawyer, or continue checking your state’s current laws or statutes around mounting Dash Cams to your windshield to ensure you are abiding by the law and are not obstructing your view of the road.

 

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